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Why is my skin changing?

Why is my skin changing?

 

Why is my skin changing?

In the transition from adolescence to adulthood, puberty will trigger the movement of new chemicals in the body. Depending upon whether you’re male or female, these hormones will go to work on different parts of the body and impact the skin.

Sebaceous (oil) gland activity is stimulated by androgen hormones. These hormones act like a switch and increase oil production and hair growth. They are also responsible for the triggers that lead to oily skin and breakouts. These so-called "male" hormones are present in both males and females.

Pores (follicles) may become enlarged, skin texture may change and feel less smooth, the skin may seem and feel shiny, cheeks may feel more sensitive and appear pink, and your formerly immaculate skin may now have visible pimples, blackheads, and whiteheads.

Your scalp and hair may get oilier, and you may notice that hair is growing in unexpected areas. With the capacity to sleep all day and physical modifications such as a deeper voice for males and a wonderful new body odour, we expect mood swings.

The good news is that these androgens that tend to be present in relatively large amounts during adolescence become stabilised as you reach adulthood. Meaning the oily skin and breakouts will lessen and clear up for most people.

Through our skin blog, Instagram, Tik Tok, and Facebook, as well as an online face mapping option, Dermalogica provides a wealth of information to assist you as you navigate the changes taking place in your skin. Dermalogica NZ offers Face Mapping and the chance to connect with a therapist online here: Contact Us — Dermalogica NZ

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